A message from our interim chief dental officer

To our esteemed patients,

Let me be the first to welcome you back! ICHS has reopened our dental clinics following Gov. Jay Inslee’s announcement on Monday, May 18 that dental services can resume. We are taking every possible precaution to ensure the safety and well-being of you and your loved ones so you can get the preventative care you deserve. In addition to in-person appointments, we have telemedicine options available for virtual visits.

Over the past few weeks, our dental teams have received training on safety policies and procedures to deliver care during this unprecedented time. We have also made all necessary changes to meet Washington state public health criteria for reopening.

While things may be different at our clinics, one thing hasn’t changed: our commitment to your health.

International District Dental Clinic
Monday to Friday, 9 am-5 pm

Holly Park Dental Clinic
Tuesday to Saturday, 9 am-5 pm

Bellevue Dental Clinic
Monday to Friday, 9 am-5 pm

Shoreline Dental Clinic
Monday to Friday, 9 am-5 pm

ICHS Dental Safety Protocols

  • Screening: All patients, visitors and staff are screened and have their temperatures checked before entering ICHS facilities. Staff are trained to identify COVID-19 symptoms.
  • Masking: We are following universal masking procedures.
  • Safety Equipment: Dental providers are fully equipped with masks, face shields and other safety equipment during all appointments to ensure staff and patient safety.
  • Waiting times: We have updated appointment scheduling to expedite patient visits.
  • Layout: We have modified ICHS facilities to support physical distancing.
  • Cleaning: We are thoroughly cleaning all surfaces and sanitizing equipment before and after each patient.

Call us today at 206.788.3700 to schedule an appointment. We are also here to address your concerns via telephone triage services and care coordination by phone.

Thank you for your continued support and we look forward to caring for you!


Samantha Lee-Chiu, DDS
Interim Chief Dental Officer

Teledentistry & emergency dental care

Pain doesn’t wait and we’re here to help if you have concerns or a dental emergency during Gov. Jay Inslee’s order to halt dental services through May 18.

Teledentistry screenings

Teledentistry provides consults with your ICHS provider via phone, smart device or computer. Call us to arrange a teledentistry screening if you have pressing symptoms such as bleeding, facial swelling, abscess, trauma or pain.

We can prescribe medication and provide instructions if it’s an issue that can safely wait. We will schedule a dental appointment as soon as possible if you need more immediate care.

Same-day appointments

The ICHS International District dental clinic is open six days a week for emergency dental care. We offer same-day appointments on a first-come, first-served basis.

For more information

Call: 206.788.3700

International Community Health Services to Receive $100K from Siemens Foundation to Support COVID-19 Response

Seattle-Based Community Health Center is one of 12 Receiving Financial Support from the Non-Profit Organization

The Siemens Foundation today announced it is providing $100,000 to International Community Health Services (ICHS) to respond to the COVID-19 crisis. The community health center is one of 12 receiving financial support from the non-profit organization established by Siemens USA. Aligning with its dedication to social equity, the Siemens Foundation, including funding provided to it by Siemens Healthineers, is committing a total of $1.5 million to support these critical healthcare providers so they can continue serving their communities when they are needed most.

“We are grateful to the Siemens Foundation and its support of ICHS’ essential role in maintaining the health of our communities,” said Teresita Batayola, ICHS CEO. “ICHS is needed now, more than ever and these funds support our viability and strength. This generous gift helps us meet the challenge of ensuring health care for all, regardless of insurance status or ability to pay. It supports ICHS efforts to deliver new remote models of care and bolsters our partnership in state efforts to reduce transmission through increased testing.”

This grant will help ICHS continue to provide services to vulnerable populations amid pandemic-related funding challenges and unanticipated financial burdens. Since its founding in the early 1970s, ICHS has been a primary source of affordable, in-language health care for the region’s diverse residents. Last year, ICHS served over 32,000 patients at its 11 locations, 69 percent of whom were low income and about 7 percent uninsured.

“Community Health Centers are the backbone of health care for low-income and vulnerable communities,” Congressman Adam Smith (D-WA). “The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly strained CHC personnel and resources, who are already underfunded. This generous donation to International Community Health Services will help them to continue their incredible work protecting and improving the health and safety of patients at a time when support for health care providers is desperately needed.”

“International Community Health Services is tirelessly working on the frontlines of the COVID-19 response, ensuring that historically marginalized and vulnerable communities receive the resources and care they need during this pandemic,” said Seattle Mayor Jenny A. Durkan. “I’m heartened to learn that their deep commitment to health and equity continues to be recognized, and grateful for their longstanding investment in the health of wellness of our community.”

ICHS was selected using equity criteria developed by the Siemens Foundation in consultation with the National Association of Community Health Centers, the Minnesota Association of Community Health Centers, and Siemens. The center is free to use the funding as it deems necessary in response to the crisis.

“As the COVID-19 crisis disproportionately threatens lower-income and medically underserved communities, it’s important for us to support the institutions that sustain our social compact,” said David Etzwiler, CEO of the Siemens Foundation. “Community health centers and their staff are on the front lines providing primary care every day and they now play an especially critical role in our medical services infrastructure when emergency services and hospital settings are overwhelmed. Vital services like these are paramount to supporting equity across America.”

The $1.5 million total commitment is funded, in part, by the Siemens Healthineers Fund of the Siemens Foundation, supported by Siemens Healthineers business in the United States.

“It is a critical time to ensure all patients and families are able to access the care they need,” said Dave Pacitti, Siemens Foundation Board of Directors member; President of Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc.; and Head of the Americas for Siemens Healthineers. “The nation’s community health centers are a vital safety net for millions of patients, and these investments will help them to continue providing affordable care that strengthens the entire U.S. healthcare system in combatting the pandemic.”

Governor Inslee visits ICHS clinic, urges vigilance against Covid-19

From left: Sharissa Tjok, Outreach & Enrollment Coordinator; Rachel Koh, Chief Operations Officer; Asqual Getaneh, Chief Medical Officer; Gildas Cheung, ICHS Board President; Hermes Shahbazian, Chief Financial Officer; Gov. Jay Inslee; Ron Chew, ICHS Foundation Director; Teresita Batayola, President and CEO.

Governor Jay Inslee visited the International District clinic of International Community Health Services on Tuesday, March 3, to meet with ICHS leadership and held a press conference on the state’s efforts to address the Covid-19 (coronavirus) outbreak.

During the press conference, Governor Inslee and State Health Officer Dr. Kathy Lofy reiterated the importance of being vigilant about washing hands and staying home if you become sick. “We are all in this together,” he said. “We are all potential subjects and we all got to pull together on this issue.”

Inslee’s tour, scheduled before the spread of Covid-19, was originally planned to discuss barriers to health care coverage and the state’s efforts to expand coverage with Cascade Care, the nation’s first public option for health insurance. ICHS CEO Teresita Batayola and her leadership team discussed with Inslee concerns about ICHS patients’ health care access in the wake of federal rules targeting immigrants and refugees.

Statement in the wake of the coronavirus

ICHS President and CEO Teresita Batayola speaking on the importance of not discriminating against people in our community wearing masks and furthering stigma at a news conference held at Asian Counseling and Referral Service on Feb. 7. Courtesy King County Public Health.

Immigrant and refugee community leaders and organizations urge everyone to know the facts about the coronavirus, not to stigmatize individuals and families from particular groups, and to speak out against bias and harassment.

After the international news broke about the coronavirus and Washington’s first case confirmed on January 21, immigrant and refugee community leaders and organizations have noticed an alarming increase in bias and harassment against our Asian American communities. We are deeply concerned about the adverse impact and ask everyone to have accurate information about the coronavirus, including what are the appropriate precautions to take to prevent the illness.

Reliable and factual information is available online from our local and state public health officials and from the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). Currently, there is no threat of a coronavirus outbreak in Washington state and King County. We are encouraging everyone to practice preventative measures, like those for the common flu or a cold that includes proper handwashing with soap and water and covering your cough or sneeze in your elbow. If you are ill, stay home and seek healthcare.

For those who may or already have confronted bias or harassment, there are resources, including in some cities, ways to report to local law enforcement an incident of bias. Please check online for additional information. We encourage everyone to promote correct information about the coronavirus, its risk and transmission, and the importance of not stigmatizing a group based on background or country of origin.

Asian Pacific Islander Coalition – King County
Asian Pacific Islander Coalition – Snohomish County
Asian Pacific Islander Coalition – Yakima
Asian Counseling and Referral Service
Asian Pacific Directors Coalition
Chinese Information and Service Center
Coalition of Immigrants Refugees and Communities of Color
Eastside Refugee and Immigrant Coalition
India Association of Western Washington
International Community Health Services
Interim CDA
King County Immigrant and Refugee Commission
OneAmerica
Pacific Islander Health Board

We’re improving your patient experience with MyChart


ICHS is pleased to announce that we have changed our electronic health records system to provide you with a better care experience. This new system will make it easier for you to access information and interact with your ICHS care team with a new online patient portal called MyChart®.

Effective immediately, MyChart gives you online access to your health records, from wherever you are. You can view test results, medications and immunizations, allergies and your medical history. You can access and coordinate care among different providers, as well as send and receive messages from your care team.

MyChart replaces the ICHS Patient Portal. If you currently have an ICHS Patient Portal account, you will need to request a new MyChart login and password.

Thank you for allowing us to partner with you for your good health. We look forward to connecting with you soon.

Historical exhibit at ICHS International District Clinic chronicles a disappearing neighborhood

From left: Kia Truong, Ron Chew, Jenifer Chao.

A permanent historical exhibit opened today in the lobby of the International Community Health Services (ICHS) flagship clinic. The collection of early documents, photos and artifacts memorializes a rapidly-disappearing Chinatown-International District, as it tells the story of the health center.

The exhibit was made possible by a $80,000 grant from Historic South Downtown and traces the growth of ICHS through its 46-year-long history.

“We were thrilled to receive such a rich repository of photos and memories from the community,” said Debbie Louie, ICHS marketing coordinator and exhibit curator.

ICHS’s history is deeply rooted within Seattle’s Chinatown-International District. Early founders and community activists, like Sister Heide Parreño, Bruce Miyahara and Bob Santos, sought to provide affordable health care for the neighborhood’s residents, most of whom were low-income first-generation Chinese, Japanese and Filipino immigrants.

“Those early residents are all gone now,” said Ron Chew, ICHS Foundation director. “We continue to honor their spirit and what they meant to the founding of our institution.”

ICHS remains a welcoming place as its patients’ needs have evolved along with burgeoning growth in King County and new immigrant and refugee arrivals. A new generation of activists and health care professionals have assumed the mantle of leadership and advocacy for affordable health care and the rights of immigrants.

Many ICHS staff members, like employee Kia Truong, patient services supervisor at the International District clinic, are first-generation immigrants themselves with a strong connection to the health center’s founding mission. Their personal experiences are also captured in the exhibit.

“I first came to the ID Clinic with my parents, after we had left a refugee camp in Vietnam for the U.S.,” said Truong, who has worked for ICHS for 22 years. “I immediately felt it was a warm place to work and to contribute to the community by helping other new immigrants.”

Yvone Ung immigrated to the U.S. from Cambodia after her family was caught in the brutality of the Khmer Rouge. Fluent in five languages, she started working for ICHS 20 years ago as an interpreter. She said speaking patients’ same language helps puts them at ease and results in better health care. “I love my job, I love ICHS” she said.

Today, ICHS serves 32,000 patients at its 11 clinic locations in Seattle, Bellevue and Shoreline. It is the largest non-profit health care organization serving Asian Pacific Islanders in Washington State. It provides interpretation in 50 different languages, making it one of the most diverse community clinics in the nation.

“We invite everyone to stop by our International District clinic to learn more about the history of ICHS and our commitment to health care for all,” said Teresita Batayola, ICHS CEO.

The historical exhibit at the ICHS International District Clinic expands on a historical display that opened in August 2018 at the Shoreline Clinic. Similar displays are planned for the ICHS Holly Park and Bellevue clinics in 2020 and 2021.

Read more about ICHS’s history inA Documentary History, a 35-year narrative view of the people and ideals behind ICHS’s work to serve Seattle’s communities written by ICHS Foundation Director Ron Chew.

ICHS earns national recognition for commitment to improve high blood pressure

International Community Health Services (ICHS) is pleased to be recognized by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American Medical Association (AMA) as a leader in the national effort to get patient blood pressure rates under control and reduce the number of Americans who have heart attacks and strokes each year.

As part of the 2019 Target: BP Recognition Program, AHA and AMA awarded ICHS with Gold Status—one of just 542 physician practices and health systems to be recognized for achieving blood pressure control rates of 70% or more in their adult patient population with high blood pressure. A total of 1,183 physician practices and health systems nationwide were recognized by the program for their commitment to help patients improve blood pressure control. The recognized organizations represent 29.8 million adult patients, with more than 8 million patients diagnosed with hypertension, across 46 states and territories.

Launched in 2015, Target: BP is a national initiative between the AHA and AMA aimed at addressing the growing burden of high blood pressure in the U.S. The initiative aims to help health care organizations improve blood pressure control rates through use of the AMA’s evidence-based M.A.P. quality improvement program, and recognizes organizations committed to improving blood pressure control.

“ICHS is committed to providing our patients with tools and treatment to effectively manage high blood pressure, so they remain at their healthy best and avoid more serious health risks,” said Asqual Getanah, ICHS medical director. “We are honored to be recognized by the AHA and AMA for high quality care. This achievement is the result of a strong and coordinated team effort to ensure patients have regular access to care, are aware of healthy lifestyle choices and take the right medicines.”

There are 116 million U.S. adults living with high blood pressure, the nation’s number one risk factor for heart attack and stroke, and less than half have it controlled to target level. Many patients are unaware of the deadly consequences associated with high blood pressure and that it can be managed working in partnership with their physician to create and follow a treatment plan.

“Although we have the tools to treat high blood pressure, many patients face a variety of barriers that make it difficult to successfully manage the condition. That’s why the American Heart Association and American Medical Association created the Target: BP initiative—to bring patients and providers together to successfully get blood pressure under control,” said AMA President Patrice A. Harris, M.D., M.A. “We applaud the physicians who are already working hard to control their patients’ blood pressure, and we will continue to urge more physician practices, health systems and patients to join this effort to prioritize the rising risk of high blood pressure and improve health outcomes for patients across the nation.”

“Collaboration is key to managing high blood pressure,” said AHA President Robert Harrington, MD, FAHA. “When doctors, clinics, patients and organizations like the American Heart Association and American Medical Association are all working towards the same goal, we have the opportunity for great success. We are pleased to be a part of the success of so many practices – and so many patients – in reducing high blood pressure and improving health.”

ICHS, along with all other practices and health systems being recognized, will be featured in upcoming Target: BP materials. This includes appearing in national journal ads, on TargetBP.org, and acknowledged at AMA and AHA events throughout the year.

Caring for our communities, from within our communities

On September 27, seven proud graduates of the ICHS Community Health Worker Internship Program came to the end of their journey more empowered to help the African, Asian and African American communities in South Seattle be healthy and thrive.

Community health workers have a deep understanding of their ethnic, cultural or religious communities to serve as a vital frontline resource. They are a trusted bridge between people who might otherwise have difficulty – because of language, culture, cost or other barriers – reaching social and health services. They provide health education and referrals, advocate for people and their communities, help fill out paperwork, and provide emotional support and guidance.

“So much was taught in a short time through monthly trainings and I can use the skills in the community,” said Rose Idambituo Idey. “I feel confident talking to people about health issues such as nutrition, breast cancer prevention, diabetes, blood pressure, alcohol and tobacco use, and mental health. This is an education I will have all my life.”

The ICHS internship program was made possible by a grant from Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in collaboration with King County Public Health. Over a six-month period, participants were trained to work directly with their communities, as well as engaged in events and special projects.

“Community health workers are a well-recognized workforce to help reduce health disparities and improve health equity,” said Rana Amini, ICHS health services manager, and the program’s founder. “The most important factor is identifying passionate community members and providing adequate training and mentorship.”

“This team has inspired me to conduct outreach with a fresh outlook and renewed enthusiasm,” said Miran Hothi, ICHS lead community advocate and the program’s head trainer. “They developed creative and imaginative approaches in the field, which resulted in improving the health outcomes of the community.”

Three participants have opted to continue the internship through a second year to focus on developing their leadership skills, working four hours per week from the ICHS Holly Park Clinic.

“I am grateful for the skills I have gained because they have given me the confidence to advocate for my community, my family and myself,” said participant Carrie Robersone.


Congratulations to our graduates: Diem Trinh, Carrie Robersone, Aparna Kamalpuram, Rose Idey, William Koy, Francoise Milinganyo and Delphin Zaki.