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International District Medical Positions

ICHS earns national recognition for efforts to reduce heart attacks and strokes

ICHS Medical Director Dr. Asqual Getaneh (far right) and ICHS Chief Medical Officer Dr. Rayburn Lewis present staff with the Target: BP award on behalf of the American Heart Association and the American Medical Association.

International Community Health Services (ICHS) patients are less likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke thanks to the health center’s success rate in controlling hypertension.

ICHS’s efforts were recently recognized by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American Medical Association (AMA) through its “Target: BP” program, which aims to improve blood pressure control and build a healthier nation. ICHS earned gold status as one of just 340 physician practices and health systems to achieve blood pressure control rates of 70 percent or greater for adult patients in 2018. Of the 103 million Americans with high blood pressure, less than half have it under control.

“Thank you to all ICHS providers for working so hard to keep our patients healthy,” said Dr. Rayburn Lewis, ICHS chief medical officer. “No single risk factor has more impact on whether or not cardiovascular disease ends up being a killer than high blood pressure. Fortunately, high blood pressure can be managed under the care of a professional staff of physicians and advanced practice clinicians. We connect our patients to dieticians, health educators and clinical pharmacists to make sure they are eating right, seeing their doctor regularly and taking their medication properly. Additionally, we make sure our training reflects best practices for taking blood pressure readings and that hypertension data is recorded accurately.”

Launched in 2015, Target: BP is a national initiative of the AHA and AMA aimed at addressing the growing issue of high blood pressure. More than 1,600 physician practices and health systems nationwide have joined Target: BP.

Fight the proposed changes to “public charge”

The Department of Homeland Security has proposed changes to the definition of “public charge” that would expand the criteria that apply when a person is applying for admission to the United States or seeking a green card or legal permanent residency.

Historically, those applying for permanent status must demonstrate that they will not be dependent on government programs (cash benefits like Temporary Assistance to Needy families/TANF, SSI and long-term care). The proposed regulation would expand the list of federal benefits that the government may consider as part of its process, to include:

  • Medicaid
  • Medicare Part D (low income subsidy for prescriptions)
  • Federal Housing (Section 8 housing vouchers and any Section 8 housing)
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly known as Food Stamps)

ICHS believes this proposal undermines public health and humanitarian values as it continues to attack immigrants seeking legal residence in the U.S.

Our communities must make public comments by December 10 to stop or delay the adoption of this proposal. All comments have to be reviewed by the government prior to adoption. ICHS urges patients, families and communities to stay calm and take action to:

  1. STOP FINAL ADOPTION OF THE NEW REGULATION. ICHS is working with Protecting Immigrant Families, Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations and the National Association of Community Health Centers to try and stop the proposal’s final adoption by generating as many public comments as possible by the Dec. 10 deadline. You can submit as many comments as you want, but each comment must be unique.
  1. GET THE SUPPORT AND BENEFITS YOU NEED NOW. The proposed rule is not in effect and will take months to be adopted because of the public comment, review and response period that the federal government has to legally observe. There is no retroactive provision in the proposal. Anyone currently legally qualified to participate in Medicaid, Medicare Part D, public housing and SNAP IS still qualified to use them. 
  1. NOT ALL IMMIGRANTS ARE SUBJECT TO THE “PUBLIC CHARGE” TEST. Exempt are U.S. citizens; green card holders; refugees; asylees (applying for or granted asylum); people applying for green cards under the Violence Against Women Act; survivors of trafficking, domestic violence, or other serious crimes (those who have or are applying for “U” or “T” visas); and children seeking Special Immigrant Juvenile Status.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
The City of Seattle has created an overview with Frequently Asked Questions and resources.

Robert Chinn Foundation Award will bring healing arts to Shoreline

Robert Chinn Foundation Award 2018
Left to Right: Teresita Batayola, ICHS CEO, Karen Wong, Robert Chinn Foundation president, Leeching Tran, ICHS Foundation Board president, and Ron Chew, ICHS Foundation director.

On Oct. 18, Karen Wong, president of the Robert Chinn Foundation, presented a $5,000 grant to International Community Health Services Foundation that will help connect the arts with health through a vibrant community arts space at the Shoreline Clinic.

The grant will help extend the clinic’s capacity for community-curated arts exhibitions that focus on community, social issues and topics related to health care and wellness. This year, the clinic opened a historical exhibit telling ICHS’s 45-year story and highlighting its milestones. ICHS plans to extend the exhibit area to additional space.

“We’re appreciative of this generous gift from the Robert Chinn Foundation and what it allows us to create,” said Ron Chew, ICHS foundation director. “So often public spaces are sterile and even unwelcoming. Our community gallery elevates our lobby space to encourage reflection, connection and beauty.”

The Robert Chinn Foundation Grant Program was established to promote and support programs of nonprofit organizations devoted to art, culture, health and youth development.