News

ICHS raises over $250,000 for uncompensated care at 2018 Bloom Gala

International Community Health Services (ICHS) Foundation raised more than $250,000 to support uncompensated care at its annual Bloom Gala, held on May 5, attracting nearly 400 guests at the downtown Seattle Sheraton. Major gifts included $25,000 from the KeyBank Foundation, $20,000 from the Sheng Yen Lu Foundation and $10,000 from the Ark and Winnie Chin Foundation. Last year, ICHS provided $1.3 million in care to low-income patients who could not afford to pay for services.

“I thank everyone who turned out tonight to ‘Raise the Paddle’ and give so generously,” said ICHS Foundation director Ron Chew. “ICHS is fortunate to have the support of so many who share our vision of healthier people, thriving families, empowered communities and a just society.”

This year’s Bloom Gala celebrated ICHS’ 45th anniversary. A number of current and former ICHS board members and staff were present to help honor ICHS’s past and its remarkable evolution from a small volunteer-run clinic to a full-service health center serving nearly 31,000 patients at eight clinic locations. Among them, Janyce Ko Fisher, Hiroshi Nakano, Dorothy Wong, Dr. Alan Chun and Hermes Shahbazian were honored with the Sapphire Leadership Award for their contributions and leadership, while ICHS Board and Foundation board presidents Gildas Cheung and Leeching Tran recognized Chew and ICHS CEO Teresita Batayola for their pivotal impact.

Batayola’s keynote speech reminded attendees of ICHS’s early founders, local university students and activists, who envisioned providing a place to care for the health care needs of low income, elderly Filipino and Chinese-speaking residents of Seattle’s Chinatown-International District. She drew parallels between their initial dream and ICHS’s efforts to fill the needs of a new generation of patients and immigrant arrivals.

“Much of what our founders fought for—and the proud legacy we stand on—continues to be under siege from national leaders who stoke fear and animosity against immigrants and refugees,” she said. “We will not be cowed into inaction.”

2018 Bloom Gala award winners

 

 

 

ICHS deepens leadership to enhance pharmacy care

Veteran pharmaceutical executive Rachel Koh joins as senior director of pharmacy services

International Community Health Services (ICHS) today announced Rachel Koh has been named senior director of pharmacy services, a newly created leadership position that will drive enhancements to ICHS’s pharmacy capabilities. Koh will be responsible for the administration of ICHS’s retail pharmacy operations, management of medication and vaccines within ICHS clinics, and developing new models of pharmacy care for ICHS’s rapidly expanding senior services programs.

Koh most recently served as the vice president of clinical product strategy for ZeOmega, where she helped develop new product and market strategies. She also led all certification and accreditation efforts. A pharmacist by training, Koh has more than 20 years of pharmaceutical and health care leadership experience.

“ICHS is constantly evolving with the changing needs of our patients, many of whom are low income, immigrants or refugees who face challenges to access to health care and affordable prescription drugs,” said Teresita Batayola, ICHS CEO. “As we add Rachel to the leadership team, we are strengthening our institutional response to the needs of our diverse communities, and to a sizeable local population that is getting older. A strong model of pharmacy care is important as we implement innovative programs of all-inclusive care for the elderly that allow them to ‘age in place’ within familiar and supportive surroundings.”

“I look forward to Rachel’s contributions as ICHS seeks greater efficiency and enhanced capabilities in giving our patients excellent and affordable pharmacy-related care,” said Rayburn Lewis, ICHS chief medical officer. “Her background and experience will be invaluable as we seek greater standardization of pharmacy operations, streamline the delivery of ICHS’s pharmacy services and boost patients’ access to new and emerging drugs and treatments.”

Prior to ZeOmega, Koh was associate vice president of pharmacy for Community Health Plan Washington, where she oversaw administration of pharmacy benefits. She also served in pharmacy leadership roles for organizations including Community Health Plan Washington, Group Health Cooperative and Eckerd Drugs. Koh has a MBA from the University of Washington and a bachelor’s of pharmacy from the University of Kansas.

“I’m excited about joining ICHS and returning to the non-profit sector,” said Koh. “As a first generation immigrant, I feel a strong connection to the ICHS mission and the communities it serves. I look forward to using my knowledge and experience, particularly in advanced technology applications that enhance delivery of health services, to expand the scope of ICHS’s pharmacy care.”

 

 

“I feel like I’m with family”

Three days out of seven, Lucia Leandro Gimeno, a 38-year-old trans person who often goes by “LL,” goes to dialysis treatment. After a scary hospital stay less than a year ago, LL was diagnosed with end stage kidney failure, which means LL’s own kidneys can no longer do the important job of removing the body’s waste.

 Today, LL looks dapper in a bright tee and scarf, the demands of a disease that requires constant medication, treatment and need for rest, camouflaged with an upbeat smile.

Medicaid and Medicare keep LL working and productive, but uncertainty over federal funding of these programs, and the health safety net that LL and many disabled people rely upon, leaves unsettling questions.

 “The stress that I deal with, besides the lack of awareness around trans issues, is the stress around finances and health benefits. I don’t make that much money,” said LL.

 LL is a trained doula and head of a non-profit that provides doula services to Seattle’s trans community. LL, who attended protests as a youth with two activist parents, is outspoken against efforts to curtail access to affordable health care, “It costs way less to provide free health care and education than it does to go elsewhere to bomb the s**t out of some other country or lock people in prison.”

The nation’s lack of health equity is like, “not being able to get ahead because you started a few steps behind.”

 A key part of the support system that keeps LL well and whole, is International Community Health Services (ICHS), a non-profit health center with a clinic in Seattle’s Holly Park neighborhood. Just a short walk from LL’s home, LL’s primary care provider, Dr. Jessica Guh, and an integrated team of heath care professionals, keep watch over all aspects of LL’s wellbeing.

Jie Chen, pharmacy supervisor at ICHS’ Holly Park clinic, gave one example, “The pharmacy team plays an active role caring for a patient like LL, who takes multiple medications and receives treatment from multiple sources. We make sure there is constant monitoring and safety. Perhaps most importantly, we really work to build trust over time.”

The ICHS team not only helps LL manage a potentially fatal disease, they deliver care that is sensitive to the nuances of LL’s gender identity and need for gentle handling after trauma from past medical exams. This is a first for LL, whose early experiences with the medical community left deep distrust. LL says ICHS is the first place to give such complete care.

“What you have here at ICHS is really special. I feel genuinely grateful because I do not like doctors. I don’t trust them. But that is definitely shifting because of my experience here.” LL feels at home at ICHS, “This is the best medical care I have ever had. I feel like I’m with family. I like the diversity of people and languages. That’s what I grew up with.”

Mindful of the power of making one’s voice heard, LL has a message for lawmakers. Preserve affordable health care that allows people to benefit from health centers like ICHS, “Unless you’ve lived our experiences, you can’t make decisions about our lives. And if you have, try not to forget what that feels like.”

 

 

ICHS celebrates 45th anniversary and honors transforming leaders at 2018 Bloom Gala

International Community Health Services (ICHS) today announced five recipients of the 2018 Bloom Gala Sapphire Leadership Award, to be given at the 2018 Bloom Gala on May 5.

The Sapphire Leadership Award was designated in celebration of ICHS’ 45th anniversary to honor ICHS leaders, both past and present, for transforming ICHS from a small, storefront clinic into a health center providing comprehensive care with medical, dental, behavioral health, pharmaceutical and other health services at eight clinic locations.

“I’m pleased we are recognizing long-standing board members Janyce Ko Fisher and Hiroshi Nakano. We’re equally pleased to honor Dorothy Wong, Dr. Alan Chun and Hermes Shahbazian for their seminal leadership in adding behavioral health and dental services, and acknowledging our communities’ health care needs beyond the Chinatown/International District to open the Holly Park clinic. These steps advanced ICHS beyond its birth origins,” said Teresita Batayola, ICHS CEO. “These leaders offer us inspiration and a reminder to dream and persevere as we face new challenges and as those we serve face new threats to continued access to affordable, high quality health care.”

ICHS Sapphire Leadership Award recipients

Each year, ICHS honors those whose service has improved the lives of ICHS target populations of disadvantaged and underserved residents at the Bloom Gala. This year’s award goes to:

Hiroshi Nakano

Hiroshi has served on the ICHS Board since 1997, often filling key leadership roles. He is a long-time ICHS consumer. He currently serves on the Quality Management Committee and Compliance Committee. He is vice president of value based initiatives for Valley Medical Center and serves as a member of the Washington Health Exchange Board.

Hiroshi has worked in the health care field for the past 30 years. “My greatest accomplishment was helping stabilize the ICHS board during a turbulent time in its evolution, getting alignment on a common mission and building new leadership. We’ve had success, but it has taken 15 years. A lot of non-profits fail at this. A lot of credit goes to the community for rallying to support ICHS at key junctures when we’ve needed them.”

 

Janyce Ko Fisher

Janyce Ko Fisher first joined ICHS in the early 1970s as a volunteer lab technician at the Asian Community Health Clinic on Beacon Hill, the forerunner to ICHS. Recruited to the cause by Dr. Allen Muramoto, an activist and founder honored by the ICHS Foundation in 2017, Janyce has served on the ICHS Board since 1975. She graduated from the University of Washington in 1971 with a medical technologist degree. Janyce has been working as clinical laboratory scientist at Seattle Children’s Hospital since 2001.

Janyce says she continues to be inspired by the ICHS mission of service to the community and providing quality affordable care to underserved populations. “I can’t believe how much ICHS has grown from that small free weekly clinic on Beacon Hill. It’s given me great satisfaction to be part of this.”

 

Dorothy Wong

Dorothy served as ICHS executive director from 1993 to 2005. During her tenure, ICHS helped establish the Community Health Plan of Washington, the first not-for-profit managed care plan in Washington State. Under Dorothy, ICHS grew from a budget of $1.9 million to $15 million and ICHS expanded its services to Holly Park, and the ID clinic found a new home in the International District Village Square. After leaving ICHS, she worked as executive director of Chinese Information and Services Center from 2013 until October 2017.

Dorothy says her proudest moment was getting ICHS into the ID Village Square. “We were in a spacious facility that met health code requirements and we got new furniture and medical equipment. We also added dental services at this site. The momentum from this community effort allowed ICHS to move into major growth mode going forward. We were no longer this raggedy, storefront operation.”

 

Alan Chun, ICHS Physician. Seattle-International DistrictDr. Alan Chun

Dr. Chun is a medical doctor at the ICHS International District Clinic. He has been at ICHS since 1994, serving as medical director for over a decade immediately after his hiring. He is a Honolulu native and a graduate of the University of Hawaii School of Medicine. Dr. Chun, a third-generation Chinese American, says one benefit of working at ICHS has been the opportunity to learn more Cantonese from his patients and to focus on the care of seniors. “During the past two-and-a-half decades at ICHS, I’ve gotten older along with my patients, so we’ve been able to share the challenges of being an older person together.”

 

 

Hermes Shahbazian

Hermes is chief financial officer at ICHS. His work has been pivotal in transforming the organization from a small storefront clinic into a regional health care provider. During his tenure, ICHS has grown from 15 to over 500 employees. Last year, Hermes was honored by the Puget Sound Business Journal as one of the region’s top CFOs.

Hermes says every day at ICHS brings something new. “Every day, month and year, we have a new initiative and project to implement. Since day one it has been like working at a startup company. It is never boring. We are always exploring new locations, additional services, upgrading software and infrastructure and finding new revenue sources. It is extremely satisfying to work in a diverse workplace and serve patients from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds.”

ICHS’ 45-year legacy began with serving elderly residents in Seattle’s Chinatown-International District to become a thriving regional organization with over 500 employees that treated nearly 31,000 patients last year, and provided assistance in over 134,000 visits with health education, outreach & enrollment, eligibility and other services.

2018 Bloom Gala tickets available now

The Bloom Gala brings together approximately 450 supporters to raise money to cover the costs of uncompensated care. Last year, ICHS provided nearly $1.3 million in care to low-income patients who could not afford to pay for services. This year’s Bloom Gala will take place on May 5 at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are available at www.ichs.com/bloom. For more information contact tagoipahm@ichs.com or call (206) 788-3672.