ICHS receives first delivery of COVID-19 vaccines

ICHS staff COVID19 vaccinations

On Dec. 23, International Community Health Services (ICHS) was among the first of the area’s health centers to receive doses of the COVID-19 vaccine and begin vaccinating frontline health workers.

Reactions were jubilant, as staff saw the end of a challenging year and the nation’s largest health crisis, come into sight.

Ping Yang receives COVID19 vaccine
Ping Yang, ICHS acupuncturist

“The shot has no pain at all for me,” said Ping Yang, acupuncturist, first to be delivered the vaccine at the International District Clinic. “At last I don’t have to worry, because I’m seeing patients every time and no one knows who is carrying what. The vaccine is good for me, my family, my community and hopefully I can visit my parents, they are 97 years old.

Community members can be confident that the vaccine is safe and that it works, said Dr. Asqual Getaneh, ICHS chief medical officer. “I enthusiastically rolled up my sleeve to be vaccinated and urge everyone to do the same. It is the best way to look out for yourself, your family and your community. I will now be able to spend Christmas with my 89-year-old father with additional protection and without great anxiety. This is how we stop people from dying and return to normal life.”

The vials of the Moderna vaccine are a milestone in ending the pandemic. Initial supplies will be limited and given to groups at highest risk, such as health care workers and people in long-term care facilities, said Getaneh. The next priority groups will be essential workers with higher risk of exposure, adults with underlying health conditions and adults 65 years and older. Eventually there will be enough for everyone who wants a vaccination. She urged patience, as well as offered a reminder there will still be a need to wear a mask, maintain distancing and practice good hygiene for some time.

In February 2020, ICHS was the first community health center in the nation to see a positive COVID-19 diagnosis. As a result, ICHS has helped set best practices guiding the response of the nation’s nearly 1,400 federally qualified health centers, which collectively serve 30 million people, most of them low income, immigrants and refugees.


For more information

Visit the Public Health – Seattle & King County website for the latest information and updates about vaccine development and distribution.

We encourage you to talk to your ICHS doctor about the vaccine’s benefits. Please visit our page with COVID-19 vaccine updates to learn more. 

Run your own way in the 2021 Lunar New Year Virtual 5k

Lunar New Year Virtual 5k 2021 ICHSICHS Foundation today opened registration for the annual 2021 Lunar New Year 5k at www.ichs.com/5k.

Beginning on the first week of the Lunar New Year Feb 12th – 18th, the Lunar New Year Virtual 5k’s new format provides more flexibility for participation. Registrants choose their own course and personal day to race, while encouraging safely physically distancing during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Race proceeds fund patient health care access

All race proceeds will fund patient health services for families who could not otherwise afford them.

“Its been a tough year, and ICHS has been on the frontlines caring for patients and our communities.” says Ron Chew, ICHS Foundation Director, “This event is a way for us all to celebrate a new, better year ahead and support our patients.”

The event is hosted by the ICHS Foundation, a separate non-profit that fundraises year round to support ICHS’s patients with free or low-cost health services. The COVID-19 pandemic and disruptions to the health insurance coverage for many Washington residents highlights the importance of providing affordable health care access to anyone who needs it.

Registration is now open

The Lunar New Year Virtual 5k is open to all ages. Participants run or walk the course of their choice during the first week of the Lunar New Year (Feb. 12-18, 2021). Registration is $35 with an early bird discounted price of $30 ending Jan. 12, 2021. Attendees under 14 or 65 and older can participate for free.

COVID-19: Vaccine update

UPDATED on 1/20: We are currently in Phase 1B/Tier 1 of Washington state’s vaccine rollout. Tier 1 includes all people 65 years and older and people 50 years and older who live in multigenerational households. This is in addition to those eligible during Phase 1A, which includes health care workers at high risk for COVID-19 infection, first responders, people who live or work in long-term care facilities, and all other workers in health settings who are at risk of COVID-19.

Thank you for your interest in the COVID-19 vaccine. We are currently offering vaccine appointments to ICHS patients and community members who qualify through the DOH Phase Finder tool.

  1. Eligible ICHS patients. Your care team will contact you by phone to schedule an appointment at one of our COVID-19 vaccination events. Please do not contact our call center about scheduling.
  2. Eligible patients and community members. A limited number of appointments are open on a first-come, first-served basis through our online appointment page here. We suggest you check back frequently.

We each have a responsibility to ensure that those around us are protected and we help reduce COVID-19 transmission by being vaccinated. However, it’s important to remember that even after vaccination you must continue to wear a mask around others, stay at least 6 feet away, avoid crowds and wash your hands often. We must use every tool to prevent infection until enough people have immunity to the virus to prevent its spread. This is the only way we can halt the pandemic and ensure the health of our family members, friends and neighbors.

How vaccines are prioritized

Vaccinations are happening in phases based on Washington state Department of Health guidelines. Check your vaccine eligibility through the DOH Phase Finder tool here.

Our state’s timeline

The DOH has released a timeline that will help you understand which priority group you belong to and when it will be your turn to get the vaccine. This timeline is just an estimate and could change based on state and federal vaccine supplies. See the estimated timeline.

FAQs

Not getting a vaccination is more than an individual choice, it has a much wider impact on everyone’s health and wellbeing. It will make it harder to achieve herd immunity, a level of immunity that will prevent the virus from circulating in the community, and protect us all. Without immunization, you place yourself at greater risk of severe illness or long-term health issues from COVID-19. When you get the vaccine, you also help protect people in high-risk groups that might not be able to get vaccinated themselves.

The COVID-19 vaccine will be covered by Medicare, Medicaid and most private insurance, and will be free if you are uninsured.

The two vaccines approved by the FDA work similarly. They cause the body to develop fighter cells called antibodies. A genetic code of a small part of the virus (the spike protein) is injected into the body; this is taken up by cells, which reproduce the protein. These are then recognized by the body as foreign proteins. The fighter cells work to get rid of the proteins, while creating a memory bank of these proteins to defend against future infection.

Nearly all COVID-19 vaccines being studied in the United States require two shots. The first shot starts building protection, but everyone has to come back a few weeks later for the second one to get the most protection the vaccine can offer.

Vaccine safety is a priority. All COVID-19 vaccines must go through a rigorous and multi-step testing and approval process before they can be used. They will only be approved if they pass safety and effectiveness standards. Many people took part in this testing to see how the vaccines offer protection to people of different ages, races and ethnicities, as well as those with different medical conditions. Vaccines will also be monitored for safety once they are given.

Your arm may be sore, red or warm to the touch. These symptoms usually go away on their own within a week. Some people report getting a fever, fatigue, headache, chills, or muscle and joint pain. This is a natural response and a sign that your immune system is doing exactly what it is expected to do. It is working to build protection to disease. Vaccines will also be monitored for safety once they are given.

No, the vaccine will not cause the COVID-19 illness. The vaccine is made up of only a part of the virus (the spike protein), just enough for the body to recognize is as a foreign material to produce antibodies.

Some people feel sick after vaccination. These symptoms are the same symptoms we get when we have the infection and are a sign of the body working hard to fight the infection and develop antibodies.

COVID-19 vaccines are being tested in large clinical trials to assess their safety. However, it does take time, and more people need to be vaccinated before we learn about very rare or long-term side effects. That is why safety monitoring will continue by an independent group of experts with the CDC. They will provide regular safety updates for our immediate action.

We don’t know how long protection lasts for those who get infected or those who are vaccinated. What we do know is that COVID-19 has caused very serious illness and death for a lot of people. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine is a safer choice.

Both the vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and from Moderna have two doses. After only one dose your protection might be around 50%. The second dose provides a boost that gives strong, long-lasting immunity. After both doses, both the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines have 94% and 95% efficacy, respectively.

It will take about a week after the second dose for you to have the vaccine’s full protection.

No, the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines, while using the same approach, are different from each other. So the second dose should be the same vaccine.

You will still need to practice precautions like wearing a mask, social distancing, handwashing and other hygiene measures until many more people are vaccinated. This is because there’s still a chance you could pass the virus to someone else even though you don’t get sick yourself.

If you’ve had COVID-19, you have natural immunity that may last months to years but is not indefinite. People who have had COVID-19 may be advised to get the vaccine because they could still be reinfected and could still possibly infect someone else.

Yes, you can receive COVID-19 vaccine while pregnant or breastfeeding. Even though pregnant and breastfeeding women were not included in the clinical trials, experts support vaccination to prevent infection.

Children below age 16 have not been included in current trials and are not considered a priority.

No, while the vaccine is made of a genetic material, it does not interact with the genome. It encodes for specific proteins (in this case the spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus), which then gets decoded by the ribosome (protein making organelle/part of a cell) located outside of the nucleus where our genome is housed. mRNA in the cell is also degraded relatively quickly limiting long-lasting impact.

For more information

Visit the Public Health – Seattle & King County website for the latest information and updates about vaccine development and distribution.

As cases surge, ICHS brings first free high-volume COVID-19 test site to the Eastside

ICHS COVID-19 TESTING

International Community Health Services (ICHS) is bringing convenient, free COVID-19 testing to the Eastside. On Dec. 15, ICHS opens the first high-capacity COVID-19 test site on the Eastside at Bellevue College, expanding efforts to control the spread of COVID-19 in east King County and along the I-90 corridor as local cases continue to spike. The test site is operated by ICHS and hosted by Bellevue College, with support from King County and the City of Bellevue.

People are strongly encouraged, but not required, to register for a testing appointment here. Testing is free and open to anyone, regardless of insurance or immigration status. Operating hours are Monday through Saturday, from 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

“We are so pleased to work with King County and the City of Bellevue to open this large-scale testing site serving the Eastside and its diverse community members,” said Teresita Batayola, ICHS CEO. “Expanded testing is to the benefit of all Eastside residents during this critical stage of the pandemic. ICHS multilingual staff and providers will play an important role making sure no one is left behind because of language or culture – and all of our friends, neighbors and family members are connected to much-needed health care and testing.”

“I thank International Community Health Services and Bellevue College for their assistance in setting up this new testing site on the Eastside,” said Dow Constantine, King County executive. “This holiday season, the greatest gift we can give our friends and loved ones – and ourselves – is good health and peace of mind. We must remain vigilant to bring this virus under control, and bring our community and economy back stronger than ever.”

The Eastside is home to a number of different language communities – 13.3% of households in Bellevue are limited English speaking compared to six percent of households overall in King County from 2014 to 2018. ICHS regularly provides free on-site and remote interpretation in over 50 languages and dialects at its clinics and its multilingual staff are experienced in meeting the needs of a diverse patient community. The Bellevue College testing site adds to drive-thru testing ICHS currently provides at its International District Medical-Dental Clinic in Seattle.

“It is through these strong partnerships from community providers like ICHS that makes these sites possible,” said Patty Hayes, director of Public Health – Seattle & King County. “ICHS has a long history of providing culturally relevant care and this expertise will be extremely valuable for the diverse language communities we hope will access this site.”

“The new, free testing site at Bellevue College will be a valuable resource for our diverse community, especially as we work together to minimize and ultimately overcome the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Lynne Robinson, City of Bellevue mayor. “I want to thank Public Health – Seattle & King County, Bellevue College and operator ICHS for their partnership and for making this testing site a reality. It is also critical that Bellevue residents continue to follow Public Health’s guidance; wear a mask, stay home when you can, avoid indoor gatherings, and quarantine and get tested if you feel sick.”

Getting there

The new test site is located at Bellevue College, 2645 145th Ave SE, Bellevue, WA 98007. The entrance is on 148th Ave SE. Drive-thru and limited walk-up testing is available. The test site is available via the 221, 226, 228, 245, and 271 bus lines.

Support for isolation and quarantine

If you have COVID-like symptoms or have had close contact with someone with COVID-19, Public Health – Seattle & King County urges you to avoid contact with others and get tested immediately. Stay home and away from others while you are waiting for test results.

Anyone who tests positive should isolate immediately. For those without a safe place to do so, King County isolation and quarantine sites are available to help people through a difficult situation and reduce risk of transmission. This is especially important for those living with a family member who is elderly or medically fragile, or people experiencing homelessness. Call the King County COVID-19 Call Center (206) 477-3977 to see if isolation and quarantine services are right for you.

ICHS Foundation seeks executive director as Ron Chew retires

Ron Chew, ICHS Foundation director and Heidi Wong, AiPACE capital campaign manger, visiting Olympia to advocate for AiPACE.

International Community Health Services (ICHS) Foundation is searching for a new executive director as Ron Chew retires on January 1. Chew has led the ICHS Foundation for the past 10 years, effectively steering the recruitment of an active board of directors and new fundraising and capital campaign initiatives, as well as building a vibrant network of support.

Ron at Shoreline
Ron Chew with Dan Eernissee, economic development program manager at the City of Shoreline, during construction of the ICHS Shoreline clinic in 2014.

“Thanks to Ron’s strong leadership, the ICHS Foundation is well-positioned to welcome new leadership in support of ICHS’s vision and promise of affordable health care for all,” said Teresita Batayola, ICHS CEO. “His many contributions ensure ICHS and the Foundation will continue to serve our communities and meet our patients’ needs far beyond the COVID-19 pandemic and for generations to come.”

Chew recently completed his memoir, “My Unforgotten Seattle,” and says he is looking forward to spending time on more writing projects. Chew made indelible imprints on the community over the years, as a longtime editor of the International Examiner, a visionary leader reimagining the Wing Luke Museum, and now as the director who built the capacity and potential of the ICHS Foundation. As he transitions into retirement, he will continue to support Aging in PACE (AiPACE), a partnership between ICHS and Kin On, in its $20 million capital campaign to build and operate a Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) to care for those who are qualified for nursing home care but want to stay in the community and live in their own homes.

“It’s been a privilege to have served ICHS during the later stages of its evolution from a ramshackle one-room storefront clinic into a full service health care provider with 11 different sites,” said Chew. “I look forward to continuing to assist ICHS and Kin On with raising funds to complete the ‘aging-in-place’ site on Beacon Hill.”

Chew previously served as executive director of the Wing Luke Asian Museum from 1991 to 2007, setting its course to become a culturally thriving and financially viable institution. Before that, he worked for over 13 years as editor of the International Examiner, where he was instrumental in a larger movement to recognize the role of ethnic and neighborhood newspapers in anchoring healthy communities.

Established in 2007, the ICHS Foundation’s mission is to build donor support from individuals, businesses, community partners and private foundations to sustain charity care provided at ICHS clinics and to bridge operational shortfalls that are not covered through public resources.

See the job listing here. For more information, please call 206.788.3672 or email foundation@ichs.com.

2021 Health Insurance Open Enrollment

Now you can enroll, renew or change your health plan through Washington HealthplanFinder. There are more plans to chose from, including a new, affordable health plan option called Cascade Care. Take time to compare plans as you may qualify for a low-cost one.

Open Enrollment Calendar DateImportant Dates

Nov. 1 – Open enrollment begins

Dec. 15 – Last day to register for a health plan that begins Jan. 2021

Jan. 15 – Last day to register for a health plan that begins Feb. 2021

If you miss open enrollment, you cannot enroll in a health plan unless you have a special qualifying “life event”.

ICHS is here to help

ICHS provides free help to our patients and for anyone seeking to enroll or renew their health insurance. Schedule an appointment with one of our multilingual outreach and enrollment navigators. They can explain your health plan options and assist you with enrolling.

Our staff speak languages including: Amharic, Chinese (Mandarin, Cantonese, Toisanese), Korean, Russian, Tigrinya, and Vietnamese.

Call (206) 788-3700 to schedule an appointment. We are only accepting appointments by phone.

Learn more about ICHS insurance assistance.

PACE programs shift senior health care to the home during COVID-19

ICHS
Seniors in the ICHS PACE program ‘age in place’ in their homes and neighborhood. Rick Wong photo.

As the COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately hit nursing home residents it has drawn attention to the benefits of the nation’s PACE (Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly) programs, which allow frail seniors to “age in place” in their own home instead of a nursing home. Enrolled seniors are safer from infection because they are supported to thrive at home.

Janet joined PACE in August 2019 so she could continue living at her home in Seattle’s Greenwood area. She was delighted that her insurance covered the International Community Health Services (ICHS) PACE program and enjoyed the adult day services at ICHS Legacy House.

When COVID-19 began spreading in King County, “PACE made a series of quick and abrupt decisions,” said Dr. Kannie Chim, ICHS PACE medical director. After weeks of declining visits, on March 9, in the interest of patient safety, Legacy House closed group activities. “The team had to pivot to reaching people through other means.”

Staff made weekly phone calls to check on participants’ and share information. Knowing that many lacked safe transportation options, PACE staff began delivering food coordinated by PACE dietitians so participants could continue sheltering in place. The PACE team also increased home visits to ensure seniors received the care they needed to stay healthy.

“Doctors, physical therapists, nurses, almost everyone comes to your home to check on you,” said Janet. “I’ve had home safety checks and they are very careful.”

PACE staff also taught Janet how to connect to telehealth services. “Everyone in the program is motivated and responsive to patients,” she said. “I like it, especially during this difficult period.”

 

Healthy aging at home

PACE programs are individually designed for each participant and managed by a team. Care is interdisciplinary—a social needs analysis and investigation into individual health barriers are part of the program. Care is culturally competent, able to meet participant needs with respect to cultural traditions, language and preferences. The goal is to allow individuals to safely live in their community for as long as possible. When that is no longer feasible, PACE can coordinate transitions that keep the participant centered in his or her care.

“It’s team-based,” said Dr. Chim. “At PACE, we say ‘Let us take all of this and put it under one roof and take care of it. Let us help, we are going to coordinate this.’”

Mei and her husband live in the Chinatown-International District (C-ID) neighborhood of Seattle. Before the pandemic, PACE drivers would pick up Mei’s husband three times a week and take him to ICHS Legacy House for medical care, physical therapy and activities. The couple continue to live in their C-ID apartment while Mei’s husband receives the primary care he needs, staying connected to multiple services to help keep him healthy.

PACE team members include doctors, therapists, nutritionists, drivers, behavioral health specialists, social workers and administrative staff to coordinate an individualized care plan.

Many ICHS PACE participants take part in adult day services and social activities at ICHS Legacy House. They may also receive care within their own home that ranges from therapy and medical visits, to meal deliveries and home safety assessments.

To be eligible for PACE, participants must be 55 or older and in need of nursing home level of care as defined by Washington state.

Most participants “join the PACE program needing a little help,” explained Dr. Chim. “You are living at home and can get around and still do your daily activities, but you are just getting by. We want to help participants not only survive, but thrive.”

 

Setting the PACE ahead

During the pandemic, long-term care facilities have been especially vulnerable to outbreaks of COVID-19. Seniors face compounding challenges, including heightened risk of infection, transportation barriers, limited access to telehealth and other difficulties.

“Offering well-coordinated, community-based health care, socialization and living support is a priority throughout this pandemic and in the future,” commented Teresita Batayola, ICHS President & CEO. “For us, PACE is the future.”

ICHS, in partnership with Kin On Health Care Center (Kin On), is taking a bold step to create a better future for elders. Established in 2015, the partnership, called Aging in PACE Washington (AiPACE), will pioneer the nation’s first aging-in-place program for the Asian Pacific Islander community. A $20 million capital campaign is underway to create a 25,000-square-foot PACE center on the north lot of Pacific Tower on Beacon Hill.

AiPACE’s facility will provide a home base for culturally-competent, in-language care for AAPI elders. It is also part of a collaborative development with affordable workforce housing by the Seattle Chinatown International District Preservation and Development Authority (SCIDpda) and childcare center operated by El Centro de la Raza.

One-Year Anniversary Party
On Aug. 28, 2020, International Community Health Services (ICHS) staff celebrated the first anniversary of ICHS PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly), a state and federally funded program designed to help seniors “age in place” at home. Rick Wong photo.

Protect yourself with a flu shot

Getting your flu shot is more important now than ever. Call 206.788.3700

The Washington State Department of Health strongly recommends everyone get vaccinated to avoid serious illness during the COVID-19 pandemic, as it is likely that both COVID-19 and the flu will be circulating at the same time. By getting the flu shot, you help keep our communities healthy because you are lowering the chance of exposure for the people around you, especially those who are unable to get the flu shot themselves.

Stop by one of our pharmacies

If you are between the ages of 19 and 64, come to the pharmacy during regular business hours at our International District, Holly Park and Shoreline clinics. Walk-ins accepted. Appointments are encouraged. Make an appointment by calling the pharmacy:

Holly Park: 206-788-3563
International District: 206-788-3708
Shoreline: 206-533-2723

SEE a primary care provider

Ask about getting a flu shot during your next visit or schedule a separate time to come in. New patients are always welcome.

We’re here to help make it safe and easy

No cost for kids and with most insurance

All children in Washington may receive flu vaccines, and other recommended vaccines, at no cost through age 18. Flu vaccine is a covered benefit provided at no cost every year through most insurance plans for adults over the age of 18, and is covered by Medicare part B.

Help if you’ve lost a job, or health insurance

We welcome all people, regardless of insurance status or income. If you do not have health insurance, we will help you determine if you qualify for a free or low cost plan, as well as your eligibility for our sliding fee discount and other free health programs and services. You will not be denied care if you are unable to pay.

Stay safe in our care

  • All patients and visitors are screened for symptoms and have their temperatures checked prior to entering our clinics.
  • Waiting time is cut down to minimize social contact. You will be moved quickly from check-in to exam room.
  • The number of guests is limited and our waiting rooms have been configured to ensure safe physical distancing.
  • All visitors are asked to wear a mask when they arrive. If you do not have a mask, one will be provided. Staff are masked at all times
  • Hand sanitizer is readily available throughout each clinic. Exam rooms are fully sanitized between visits. Common areas and high-touch spots are disinfected multiple times daily.

Feds award ICHS for care quality

International Community Health Services (ICHS) is among health centers nationwide to be recognized by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) with quality improvement awards totaling more than $117 million.

The awards recognize the highest performing health centers as well as those that have made significant quality improvements from the previous year.

ICHS received a grant award of nearly $160,000 and was recognized as a Health Center Quality Leader for achieving the best overall clinical performance among all health centers. HRSA has named ICHS a Health Center Quality Leader every year since 2014.

ICHS was also awarded as a Clinical Quality Improver for demonstrating at least 15% improvement for each quality measure from the previous year. ICHS’s use of technology to help patients access high quality care and its team-based approach were also recognized with awards in the Advancing Health Information Technology and Patient Centered Medical Home Recognition categories.

Federally qualified health centers provide primary care services for underserved communities through funds from the HRSA Health Center Program. They deliver care to about one in 11 people nationwide who are low-income, uninsured or face obstacles to getting health care, HRSA Administrator Tom Engles said in a statement. “These awards will support health centers as they continue to be a primary medical home for communities around the country,” he said.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, health centers have been on the frontlines, providing more than 3 million tests, according to HHS. “These quality improvement awards support health centers across the country in delivering care to nearly 30 million people, providing a convenient source of quality care that has grown even more important during the COVID-19 pandemic,” said HHS Secretary Alex Azar. “These awards help ensure that all patients who visit a HRSA-funded health center continue to receive the highest quality of care, including access to COVID-19 testing and treatment.”

A full list of award recipients can be found here.