ICHS receives $25,000 grant as part of KeyBank’s over $1.9 million community impact day

 

ICHS CEO Teresita Batayola and ICHS Foundation Director Ron Chew accept $25,000 KeyBank Community Impact Award on April 3.

 

International Community Health Services (ICHS) received a $25,000 grant from the KeyBank Foundation, as part of its April 3 Community Impact Day that totaled over $1.9 million to almost 20 nonprofits in the greater Seattle area. ICHS will use the funds to provide uncompensated care for target King County minority populations. In 2017, ICHS provided $1,265,435 in uncompensated care. Among nearly 31,000 patients, 41% were at or below the federal poverty level, 81% were people of color and 55% spoke limited English and needed interpretation services.

“We’re honored KeyBank recognizes ICHS’ work and success improving the health and wellness of our diverse communities with this $25,000 grant,” said Teresita Batayola, ICHS CEO. “KeyBank’s award will support ICHS health services for many of the area’s neediest and most vulnerable, including immigrants, refugees, elderly and the young.”

“Our mission is to help our communities thrive,” said KeyBank CEO Beth Mooney, who was in town from KeyBank’s Cleveland headquarters to announce the grants with Carol K. Nelson, pacific regional sales executive and Seattle market president. “Philanthropy is part of KeyBank’s DNA, and we are dedicated to building stronger communities and improving the lives of the people we call neighbors in the places we call home.”

Many of the nonprofit recipients were chosen by local Key Business Impact Networking Groups (KBINGs), employee groups that are a vital part of Key’s diversity and inclusion strategy to help KeyBank attract, engage, develop and retain a diverse workforce and inform Key’s business strategies. Seattle has eight active KBINGs: Key Executive Women’s Network, Young Professionals, Military Inclusion, African American, Asian/ Pacific Islanders, Hispanic/Latino, Champions of People of All Abilities and LGBTQA. The groups were on hand to help distribute the donations.

In the Seattle region, KeyBank actively invests in the communities it serves through philanthropy, volunteerism and board service.

 

Questions about 2019 open enrollment? ICHS is here to help

The open enrollment period to enroll, renew or change health plans through the Washington Health Benefit Exchange starts on Nov. 1 and ends on Dec. 15 for coverage to take effect on Jan. 1, 2020. Unless you qualify for Apple Health or a special enrollment period due to a qualifying event you must be enrolled to ensure there is no interruption in your health benefits and to avoid a year-long wait until the next open enrollment period in the fall of 2020.

FREE help from ICHS
ICHS provides free help for patients and for anyone seeking to enroll or renew health insurance. Plan ahead and schedule an appointment with one of our multilingual outreach and enrollment navigators, who can explain your options and assist with sign up. ICHS staff speak languages including: Amharic, Chinese (Mandarin, Cantonese, Toishanese), Eritrean, Hindi, Korean, Russian , Spanish, Punjabi, Tagalog and Vietnamese,

ICHS will offer walk-in appointments on a first-come, first-served basis on Saturdays at the ICHS International District Clinic (2nd floor) from 9 am to 3 pm. Come see us for help from a qualified navigator on the below dates:


To make an open enrollment appointment or for more information
Call ICHS at: 206-788-3700 or find enrollment information online at: https://www.wahealthplanfinder.org. You can also call or walk into any of our four full service clinics in Seattle, Shoreline and Bellevue.

ICHS patients can now access free legal help

International Community Health Services and Eastside Legal Assistance Program (ELAP) today announced a partnership that will give low income patients free legal services. Patients referred from ICHS’s Bellevue Clinic can meet with ELAP’s attorneys for advice on issues impacting their ability to stay in good health.

“ICHS cares for patients holistically. There are many factors that impact whether someone can access and benefit from quality, preventative health care,” said Vanja Knezevic, ICHS Bellevue health center manager. ”Often, low-income and marginalized patients face social issues that can exacerbate health issues. For example, a person who is facing eviction is more likely to be stressed or depressed. Someone who is wrongfully denied public benefits might be prevented from providing healthy nutrition for their family. We’re seeking to lessen these potential health impacts.”

The health care teams at ICHS’s Bellevue Clinic will work closely with ELAP’s legal aid attorneys to identify patients who qualify. Referred patients will meet with an attorney for sessions that will be scheduled at ICHS’s Bellevue Clinic.

“We are excited to move forward with ICHS,” said Gerald Kroon, ELAP executive director. “This innovative partnership will increase access to much needed civil legal aid, addressing legal issues that adversely affect a person’s medical wellbeing.”

The new partnership is being announced as a six-month pilot program, initially only available by referral through ICHS’s Bellevue Clinic, with the possibility of being extended to include ICHS’s three other full service clinics as future funding and interest allow. Services will be available to qualifying King County residents who fall below 200% of the federal poverty level, which was $50,200 for a family of four in 2018.

ICHS press conference advocates against new definition of “public charge”

International Community Health Services (ICHS) and Children’s Alliance, a member of the Protecting Immigrant Rights – WA (PIF-WA) coalition, co-hosted a press conference on Sept. 25, at ICHS’s International District Clinic. A panel of representatives from health, legal and service organizations advocated against proposed changes to the definition of “public charge” that would deny green cards to legal immigrants if they access certain public benefits.

The draft regulation released on Sept. 22, targets a wide range of non-cash public assistance—including Medicaid, food stamps, Section 8 housing assistance and Medicare prescription drug assistance.

ICHS’s Nutrition Services Supervisor Aliya Haq joined representatives from the Seattle Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs, OneAmerica, King County Public Health, Northwest Harvest and the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project to emphasize the severe health and human costs should the regulation go into effect. Participants described how half a million Washingtonians could be pushed away from crucial health, nutrition and educational assistance – to far-reaching detriment.

Haq shared stories of ICHS patients who, out of fear of future reprisal, have already denied themselves or their family members benefits, describing the resulting health and human cost as “heartbreaking.”

The panel’s legal expert also shared a strong message that immigrants and their families should not dis-enroll from public benefits in response to the draft rule’s release. If the rule were to become final—which would take several months—immigrants would not be penalized for past enrollment.

The coalition is preparing for the draft’s pending publication in the federal register. Once published, members of the public will have 60 days to file comments in opposition to slow down or block the rule. ICHS and its partners will mobilize to encourage individuals to submit comments, as well as work within communities to ease fears and misperceptions, and ensure continued access to health programs and services.

The coalition emphasized in a press statement, “Above all, families who fear they may be affected by this rule should know they’re not alone, and that there’s time to fight back.”

Aliya Haq, ICHS nutrition services supervisor, contributed as a spokesperson for a panel discussion and Q&A.

ICHS health advocate Veronica Kim named 2018 Molina Community Champion

Veronica Kim, ICHS Women’s preventative health services coordinator,was honored with the Molina Community Champion Award.

On Sept. 27, Molina Healthcare of Washington Inc., honored Veronica Kim, who served as women’s preventive health services coordinator at International Community Health Services (ICHS) for 25 years, with the prestigious Community Champion Award. The award recognized Kim’s long-time contributions to level health disparities in breast, ovarian, cervical and colon cancer fatality rates among Asian Pacific Islander (API) and minority women.

Kim recently retired from ICHS in August, to pass the torch to an up-and-coming generation of health workers. Her impact upon King County’s women of color, and in particular the Asian American community, has been immeasurable. Her work formed the backbone of ICHS’s Breast and Cervical Cancer Health Program (BCCHP), which connected nearly 2,600 low income people with life-saving screenings and treatment in 2017. Kim also brought the Swedish Cancer Institute’s Mobile Mammography Program to ICHS in 2007 after discovering many women were not making it to their mammogram referrals. Bringing the mobile mammogram clinic onsite to ICHS locations reduced a number of challenges for immigrant and low income women, giving help with scheduling, and reducing transportation and language barriers.

“There is no appropriate value that can be assigned to Veronica’s work within the community,” said Teresita Batayola, ICHS CEO. “When women and their families are scared and uncertain, unsure of where to turn or whom to trust, she is the breast health expert, and social and health service resource, and pillar of Seattle’s broader Asian American community.”

Kim was an early pioneer in addressing minority health within Seattle’s Chinatown-International District, starting her career as a family health worker for ICHS in 1993, when the regional health center was still a small clinic in Seattle’s Chinatown-International District. When the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offered funding for a program to increase breast cancer screenings for API immigrant women, Veronica was tasked with enrollment – knocking on doors to make home visits, going to churches and community organizations, and patiently waiting at neighborhood venues and businesses to talk to women.

“Many health education materials did not exist in languages other than English in those early years,” said Rana Amini, ICHS health advocacy manager. “Veronica created a library of resources from scratch so the women portrayed in pamphlets reflected the age and ethnicity of her target audiences. She ensured the availability of translation, interpretation and accurate information to empower ICHS patients to make informed, life-saving decisions about their health.”

Veronica also established in-language health fairs for the Korean, Vietnamese and Chinese-speaking communities – bringing health services directly to people within their communities, at no cost. She enrolled women in health insurance and programs for those that could not afford it.

Her work also became deeply personal. When she became a cancer patient and survivor herself, she became even more aware of the challenges faced by those she had served.

“My own experience with breast cancer treatment inspired me to give the best case management possible,” said Kim. “I have been through every step so I know what our patients are thinking and feeling.”

“Veronica inspires us all to do better,” said Ron Chew, ICHS foundation director. “I know very few people who are as optimistic and compassionate as she is. She has a warm smile and kind words to offer those around her.”

Veronica has also been an annual participant and major organizer of ICHS’s fundraising team for the Susan G. Komen Puget Sound Race for the Cure. For more than 15 years, she inspired a high level of participation among ICHS staff.

“Veronica put her heart and soul into building our women’s program,” said Batayola. “She’s changed some women’s lives forever. Because of her, Susan G. Komen has funded us close to 20 years, and continued to fund ICHS’s breast health program beyond their normal five-year cycle. She is one of a kind and I hope she continues to walk with us at Race for the Cure.”

Veronica says she doesn’t plan to leave all of her commitments behind.

“I feel blessed to have had the opportunity to work with such a wonderful, dedicated and amazing group of people for the past 25 years. During my tenure at ICHS I have learned so much. ICHS will always be a special place for me,” said Kim. “I’m excited about what’s ahead and plan to spend some time traveling. I leave soon for a trip to Korea and Hawaii. But even after retirement I will continue to advocate for and work with women.”

 

2018 National Health Center Week: Thank you ICHS heroes

NHCW 2018 at ICHS Bellevue Clinic

From Aug. 12 to 18, International Community Health Services marked National Health Center Week with celebrations that honored our health care heroes and their role making affordable health care available to people, families and communities throughout the region. ICHS looked to the past, present and future with a roundup of events.

A visit from Sharon Turner, U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration’s Region X administrator, recognized ICHS’s achievements as one of the nation’s highest performing health centers. Her visit was part of an announcement of $125 million in awards to 1,352 community health centers nationally and $3.8 million to health centers in Washington state.

HRSA announcement at International Distric clinic during 2018 NHCW

Washington state senators Maria Cantwell and Patty Murray issued statements in support of the federal grants.

“Community health centers play a critical role in making sure patients and families across Washington state, and across the country, have access to quality health care — which is why we need to make sure these centers have the resources they need,” said Senator Murray. “I’m glad we were able to reach a bipartisan agreement earlier this year to help community health centers support and enhance the great work they already do to make sure patients and families in all corners of our country have quality care within reach regardless of income, and I hope we can continue to build on that progress.”

“Community health centers provide essential health care for many of Washington’s most vulnerable patients and communities,” said Senator Cantwell. “Many children and families throughout our state rely on community health centers for primary care, dental care, mental health and addiction services, and other important health needs. I’m proud to support our community health centers, and I’m glad we have secured more resources to foster innovation and deliver high-value care to families throughout Washington state.”

 

The installation of a historical exhibit in ICHS’s Shoreline Clinic gave a nod to the past and ICHS’s 45 years of history.

ICHS: Our Story historical exhibit at Shoreline Clinic, 2018ICHS: Our Story historical exhibit at the Shoreline Clinic, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community members were invited to join the celebration with fun games and activities, and voter registration at our clinics in Bellevue, Holly Park and the International District.

2018 NHCW at the international district clinicSigning up a voter, NHCW 2018

Thank you to the many staff, community members, partners and friends who made this year’s National Health Center Week a success!

Click here and here to see more photos and highlights.

ICHS recognized among nation’s highest performing health centers

International Community Health Services (ICHS) today announced it is among 1,352 community health centers nationally that have been selected for $125 million in federal awards from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In issuing the grants, HRSA further recognized organizations exceeding national quality benchmarks as National Quality Leaders and those with the best overall clinical performance as Health Center Quality Leaders. ICHS was awarded both distinctions.

“ICHS’s consistently high quality care and outstanding clinical performance have earned a place of honor among Washington’s health centers. We have been named a Health Center Quality Leader every year since 2014, and a National Quality Leader in 2014, 2015, 2017 and 2018,” said Teresita Batayola, ICHS CEO. “These awards are based on overall patient health data as a result of our care. We are proud of this record of achievement. ICHS is an example of the exceptional value our nation’s system of community health centers routinely deliver, providing comprehensive care at significantly lower cost to millions of Americans.”

HRSA’s Quality Improvement grant awards promote continued improvements in expanding access to comprehensive care, improving care quality and outcomes, increasing comprehensive care delivery in a cost-effective way, addressing health disparities, advancing the use of health information technology, and delivering patient-centered care. ICHS’s exceptional results and standards in seven out of eight of these categories led to a grant award of $249,174.

“Being a quality leader means that ICHS patients are more likely to achieve desired health outcomes,” said Dr. Asqual Getaneh, ICHS medical director. “This points to the success our clinics are achieving across the life span from healthy pregnancies, well child care, and management of chronic conditions like diabetes. This grant will further ICHS’s efforts to widen access to high quality, affordable care among underserved communities and bring better health to greater numbers of the state’s residents.”

The award was announced at ICHS’s International District Clinic by Sharon Turner, U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration’s Region X administrator, during National Health Center Week, the annual celebration that highlights the critical role community health centers play in providing high-quality, affordable, primary health care.

“I commend ICHS for being recognized as a National Quality Leader,” said Turner. “It’s a pleasure to be here and to celebrate HRSA’s partnership with ICHS and community health centers across the nation in providing high-quality, affordable primary care.”

For a list of 2018 Quality Improvement Award recipients, visit: https://bphc.hrsa.gov/programopportunities/fundingopportunities/qualityimprovement/index.html.

 

Roger Chiu retiring after 38 years: ICHS “just like my family”

Roger Chiu, a long-time fixture at International Community Health Services (ICHS), has decided to retire this month after 38 years of dedicated service as ICHS laboratory manager and medical technician. He will be moving to Irvine, California to live closer to his son and daughter and their families.

Chiu, a modest, low-key individual, started at ICHS in 1980 right after he graduated from Seattle University’s medical technology program. At the time, ICHS was located in a storefront on Maynard Avenue, across from Hing Hay Park. Bruce Miyahara was the executive director. Chiu’s first job title was medical technologist.

“ICHS was very small, Chiu said. “The lab was on the first floor. It was a tiny space, only room for one person. I was the only one there.”

Chiu said ICHS has gone through a remarkable transformation. When he started his job, the agency only had about 30 employees. “At first, we only used paper,” he said. “In 2005, ICHS purchased NextGen software. We began putting the lab results into our Laboratory Information System, which interfaced with the software. The providers could see results right away. That made a big difference.”

Chiu, 64, said he enjoyed being able to spend his entire career at ICHS. “I liked my job because I got to work with other laboratory staff and use my skills to benefit our patients. I got to work in the lab, work with others at ICHS and interact with patients. That was a good mix.”

Some ICHS patients would specifically ask for Chiu to do their lab tests. “Some of our patients I know them from when they were just a little baby and now they are much taller than me now,” he said “It’s my privilege to serve them.”

Chiu said he will miss his co-workers. “They are just like my family,” he said. “We laughed and argued just like one. Actually I spent more time with them than with my biological family.”

ICHS CEO Teresita Batayola described Chiu as a “pillar” and “part of the foundational fabric” of ICHS. “He helped bolster our staff’s spirits and well-being over the years with his unassuming good nature, humor and deep caring.  We are so grateful for all these years.”

Join ICHS in celebration of National Health Center Week

Join International Community Health Services (ICHS) in celebration of National Health Center Week, from Aug. 12 to 18. The national campaign, themed, “Celebrating Health Centers: Home of America’s Health Care Heroes,” raises awareness about the mission and accomplishments of America’s health centers, and the dedicated staff who bring health care to the medically underserved.

In 1973, ICHS opened as a small, volunteer-run storefront clinic in Seattle’s Chinatown-International District, providing health services for low-income Filipino and Chinese elders and immigrant families.

“ICHS grew from the vision, grit and commitment of local community activists and leaders, who believed in meeting the need for affordable, skillful and culturally sensitive health care,” said Teresita Batayola, ICHS CEO. “From these humble origins, ICHS has grown to serve nearly 31,000 patients in 2017, representing 50 different language groups, at eight clinic locations.”

ICHS invites community members to help honor this legacy and ICHS’s role as part of a nationwide network of health centers that serve more than 27 million Americans. ICHS celebrations include:

  • Summer Cool Down at Holly Park clinic, Aug. 15, 11:30 am-1 pm. Cool summer refreshments and fun activities
  • Fun Fest at Bellevue clinic, Aug. 16, 10 am – 1 pm. Healthy activities, prizes and information for all people of all ages
  • Courtyard Celebration at International District clinic, Aug. 17, 10 am-1 pm. Something for everyone, children’s games, prizes, photo booth and more
  • ICHS: Our Story at the Shoreline clinic. Start of a historical exhibit honoring ICHS’s 45-year history in the 1st floor lobby. Learn more in a recent article in the International Examiner.

“The heroes who work at ICHS to make affordable health care possible for people in need – and their efforts as clinicians, nurses, pharmacists, social workers, dentists and dental hygienists, behavioral health specialists, and much more – are at the center of this year’s National Health Center Week,” said Batayola.

Together, they produce innovative solutions to the most pressing health care issues in their communities. They reach beyond the walls of conventional medicine to address the factors that may cause sickness, such as lack of nutrition, mental illness, homelessness and substance use disorders. It is their work that has helped reduce health care costs and reduce chronic disease, generating a record of success and along with it a long tradition of bipartisan support in Congress.

 

ICHS remembers Fred Yee

International Community Health Services offers its deepest condolences to the family of Fred Yee, former executive director and long-time board member of Kin On Health Care Center. Yee, who received the ICHS Bamboo Health Award in 2012, passed away at his home early Tuesday morning, Aug. 8 after an apparent heart attack. He was 67.

Yee received the Bamboo Health Award in recognition of his leadership in improving access to health services for Asians and Pacific Islanders in Washington state. In 1987, Kin On opened as the first bilingual Chinese nursing home in the Pacific Northwest.

“Fred’s passing is a very sad moment for many of us who’ve had the privilege of knowing and working with him,” said ICHS Foundation Director Ron Chew. “His bubbly upbeat attitude, unlimited passion for the community and commitment to serving the underserved were his greatest gifts. He was a wonderful role model and cherished friend. I will miss him deeply.”

Yee served as executive director of Kin On from 1988 to 1991. He remained active as a board member and chair after relinquishing the directorship to Sam Wan. Following his retirement, Yee served on the planning committee for a new partnership between ICHS and Kin On to develop a comprehensive health care and social service program for frail nursing home-eligible seniors, to be constructed on Beacon Hill in 2021.

Nigel Lo, Kin On CEO, said of Yee: “Fred was my trusted mentor and personal inspiration. His ideas, vision, and leadership was exemplified in the success of Kin On. His decades of experience, passion and dedication to serving our AAPI community were truly inspirational.”

A Celebration of Life will be held for Yee on Aug. 25 from 10 a.m. to noon at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 8501SE 40th St., in Mercer Island. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made to Kin On Health Care Center, Chinese Information and Service Center or the Yee Fung Toy Family Association.